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Clutch Size and Egg Size Variation in Willow Grouse Lagopus l. lagopus

Kjell Einar Erikstad, Hans Chr. Pedersen and Johan B. Steen
Ornis Scandinavica (Scandinavian Journal of Ornithology)
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Jun., 1985), pp. 88-94
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3676472
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3676472
Page Count: 7
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Clutch Size and Egg Size Variation in Willow Grouse Lagopus l. lagopus
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Abstract

Annual and seasonal variation in clutch and egg size are described for a Willow Grouse Lagopus l. lagopus population in central Norway, during 1978-83. There were no age-related differences in clutch size and egg size although adult hens were heavier than yearlings. Second clutches (probably re-laid) contained fewer and larger eggs than did first clutches. Clutch size differed between years and was negatively correlated with mean laying date, but there were no differences between years in egg size and hen weight. The size of individual territories ranged from 2.8 to 12.3 ha but bore no relationship to clutch size, egg size and hen weight. Clutch size decreased throughout the season, both among first and second clutches, but there was no relationship between laying date and egg size. Data on hens nesting in consecutive years showed that much more of the clutch and egg size variation was accounted for by differences between hens than by differences between territories.

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