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Parental Food Provisioning Is Unrelated to Manipulated Offspring Food Demand in a Nocturnal Single-Provisioning Alcid, the Rhinoceros Auklet

Akinori Takahashi, Maki Kuroki, Yasuaki Niizuma and Yutaka Watanuki
Journal of Avian Biology
Vol. 30, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 486-490
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
DOI: 10.2307/3677021
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3677021
Page Count: 5
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Parental Food Provisioning Is Unrelated to Manipulated Offspring Food Demand in a Nocturnal Single-Provisioning Alcid, the Rhinoceros Auklet
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Abstract

The effects of offspring food demand on the regulation of parental food provisioning were examined in the Rhinoceros Auklet Cerorhincha monocerata, a nocturnal single-provisioning species, by conducting mate removal and supplementary feeding experiments. Parents did not adjust their level of food provisioning in response to an increased or a decreased chick food demand, contrasting with previous studies of the Atlandtic Puffin Fratercula arctica and procellariiforms that provision their chicks at shorter intervals. The chicks reared by a single parent grew more slowly while those receiving supplementary food grew faster and fledged heavier and younger. The body condition of parents did not change.

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