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The Chemical Nature of Supercritical Gas Extracts from Low-Rank U.K. Coals [and Discussion]

T. G. Martin, D. F. Williams and H. Schulz
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 300, No. 1453, New Coal Chemistry (Mar. 20, 1981), pp. 183-192
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/36823
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Chemical Nature of Supercritical Gas Extracts from Low-Rank U.K. Coals [and Discussion]
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Abstract

Two processes are being developed by the National Coal Board for producing liquids from coal. Both involve extraction of the coal to produce an extract, freed from mineral matter, which is then catalytically hydrocracked. This approach is particularly suitable for producing transport fuels and chemical feedstocks. One process uses as solvent a process-derived liquid. The other uses a compressed supercritical gas to extract the more hydrogen-rich parts of the coal, leaving a reactive char which can provide the necessary hydrogen, heat and power for the process. As part of the development programme, extracts have been prepared by gas extraction over a range of conditions, and their chemical structures investigated by elemental and spectroscopic analysis. The average structures so derived consist of small aromatic clusters joined by methylene, ether and diphenyl linkages. Extracts produced by the liquid solvent route contain larger aromatic clusters.

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