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Habitats, Life Histories, Migration and Dispersal by Flight of Two Water-Beetles Helophorus brevipalpis and H. strigifrons (Hydrophilidae)

Jan Landin
Holarctic Ecology
Vol. 3, No. 3 (Sep., 1980), pp. 190-201
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Nordic Society Oikos
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3682368
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Habitats, Life Histories, Migration and Dispersal by Flight of Two Water-Beetles Helophorus brevipalpis and H. strigifrons (Hydrophilidae)
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Abstract

Populations of two Helophorus species from a Swedish lake were sampled during the ice-free periods of two years. Dispersing beetles were trapped in light-reflecting glass traps. Both species are univoltine and breed in the spring. The populations of adult H. brevipalpis are largest during the summer when great numbers emerge and migrate. Very few H. strigifrons adults emerge before spring. Its adult populations are largest in the spring, and small numbers of mature individuals fly with mature H. brevipalpis specimens. This is discussed in relation to their habitat utilization: H. strigifrons inhabits permanent waters only and is dimorphic for flight musculature; H. brevipalpis inhabits both permanent and ephemeral waters and is always equipped with a functioning flight apparatus. H. brevipalpis is an effective colonizer of ephemeral waters due to its large dispersal capacity and to the fact that the habitat of juveniles differs from that of adults. Age, sexual maturation and feeding in flying and non-flying groups are compared. Food is seldom found in the gut of fliers of either species. In the spring flying H. brevipalpis females have larger oocytes than non-flying ones; flying H. strigifrons females have smaller oocytes than non-fliers. It is possible that the summer migrations of H. brevipalpis favour outbreeding since fliers are sexually immature; spring fliers, being sexually mature, are more efficient as colonizers.

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