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Examining Risk Factors Associated with Family Reunification for Runaway Youth: Does Ethnicity Matter?

Sanna J. Thompson, Kathleen A. Kost and David E. Pollio
Family Relations
Vol. 52, No. 3 (Jul., 2003), pp. 296-304
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3700281
Page Count: 9
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Examining Risk Factors Associated with Family Reunification for Runaway Youth: Does Ethnicity Matter?
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Abstract

This study investigated the likelihood of family reunification across ethnic groups of 14,419 youth using runaway shelter services nationwide. Among White, African American, Hispanic, Native American, and Asian ethnic groups, youths who reported abuse or neglect by their parental figures or had parent(s) who were unemployed were less likely to reunify following a runaway episode. However, completing youth shelter services markedly increased the likelihood of reunification. Implications for cultural sensitivity in service delivery, particularly regarding family issues, are discussed.

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