Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Ballooning Spiders in Missouri, USA, and New South Wales, Australia: Family and Mass Distributions

Matthew H. Greenstone, Clyde E. Morgan, Anne-Lise Hultsch, Roger A. Farrow and J. E. Dowse
The Journal of Arachnology
Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer, 1987), pp. 163-170
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3705725
Page Count: 8
Were these topics helpful?
See somethings inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

Cancel
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ballooning Spiders in Missouri, USA, and New South Wales, Australia: Family and Mass Distributions
Preview not available

Abstract

Ballooning spiders were captured during a full growing season over agricultural habitats in Missouri, USA, and one week in New South Wales, Australia, using sticky traps in Missouri and tow nets in Australia. More than 2,000 spiders in Missouri and more than 800 spiders in Australia were identified to family and estimates made of their live masses. Both aeronaut faunas are dominated by the family Linyphiidae, with the remaining families making up different proportions at the two sites. The vast majority of aeronauts weighed between 0.2 and 1.0 mg, with the mass-frequency distributions at both sites tailing off rapidly beyond 2.0 mg. The most massive Missouri aeronaut weighed 25.5 mg, and the most massive Australian aeronaut 19.1 mg. These are the first published extensive data on the live masses of ballooning spiders from the field and this is the first taxonomic analysis of a Southern Hemisphere aeronaut fauna.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[163]
    [163]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
164
    164
  • Thumbnail: Page 
165
    165
  • Thumbnail: Page 
166
    166
  • Thumbnail: Page 
167
    167
  • Thumbnail: Page 
168
    168
  • Thumbnail: Page 
169
    169
  • Thumbnail: Page 
170
    170
Part of Sustainability