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The Development of Sociology and the Social Gospel in America

J. Graham Morgan
Sociological Analysis
Vol. 30, No. 1 (Spring, 1969), pp. 42-53
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/3709933
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3709933
Page Count: 12
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The Development of Sociology and the Social Gospel in America
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Abstract

The following paper analyzes the connections between the social involvement of the churches (particularly Protestant) and the beginnings of academic sociology in the United States in the final years of the nineteenth century. The Social Gospel and early sociology were often indistinguishable in terms of both ideas and leading personnel. This close parallelism is seen as a major factor in the early acceptance of sociology as an academic discipline in the nineteenth century universities, an acceptance which was not apparent in European institutions.

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