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Strength of Religious Affiliation and Life Satisfaction

Kimberly Reed
Sociological Analysis
Vol. 52, No. 2, Religion in the United States (Summer, 1991), pp. 205-210
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/3710964
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3710964
Page Count: 6
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Strength of Religious Affiliation and Life Satisfaction
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Abstract

This study examines the impact of the strength of religious affiliation on attitudes toward life satisfaction. The data are taken from the 1984 NORC survey. All things considered, religious persons should be happier, more satisfied, and more fulfilled than the nonreligious. This general assertion is tested with respect to happiness, family satisfaction, health satisfaction, and life excitement. The predicted association holds generally for happiness, family satisfaction, and life excitement. These three associations are confirmed under several, but not all, of the control conditions. Health satisfaction, by contrast, appears to be independent of the strength of an individual's religious affiliation.

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