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Reconstructing the "Cult" Experience: Post-Involvement Attitudes as a Function of Mode of Exit and Post-Involvement Socialization

James R. Lewis
Sociological Analysis
Vol. 47, No. 2 (Summer, 1986), pp. 151-159
Published by: Oxford University Press
DOI: 10.2307/3711459
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3711459
Page Count: 9
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Reconstructing the "Cult" Experience: Post-Involvement Attitudes as a Function of Mode of Exit and Post-Involvement Socialization
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Abstract

The principal evidence for the cult stereotype has been derived from the testimony of deprogrammed former members. Although scholars of new religious movements have frequently observed that deprogrammees are not neutral witnesses, systematic empirical work in this area has been scant. The present paper is a report of a survey of 154 former members of controversial religious movements. The results of this research replicate the conclusions of Trudy Solomon's study, i.e., that the tendency of ex-members to hold negative, cult-stereotypical attitudes toward their former groups is highly correlated with the extent of their exposure to the socializing influences of the anti-cult movement.

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