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The Origins and Early Development of Rhyme in English Verse

Michael McKie
The Modern Language Review
Vol. 92, No. 4 (Oct., 1997), pp. 817-831
DOI: 10.2307/3734202
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3734202
Page Count: 15
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The Origins and Early Development of Rhyme in English Verse
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Abstract

This article provides an account of the origins of rhyme and a consideration of the 'single point of origin' theory. It surveys the place of rhyme in Old and Middle English verse, and gives an account of the transmission of rhyme into English verse from Celtic and Latin Verse. It examines the factors that led to the spread of rhyme in the Middle Ages: including Christian hymn and sequence; the relation of music and poetry; the new syllabic prosody; and the verse of the troubadours

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