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Psychoanalysis, Gender, and Angelic Truth in Manuel Puig's "Pubis Angelical"

Lloyd Davies
The Modern Language Review
Vol. 93, No. 2 (Apr., 1998), pp. 400-410
DOI: 10.2307/3735356
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3735356
Page Count: 11
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Psychoanalysis, Gender, and Angelic Truth in Manuel Puig's "Pubis Angelical"
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Abstract

Drawing on the assumptions of "translation studies," the article analyses from a literary perspective scientific texts (on geology, astronomy, astrology) written in the vernacular in thirteenth-century Castile. It concentrates first on the introduction to the "Lapidario" by Judah Mosca in order to show how texts such as this when treated as literary prose compositions in the vernacular may yield evidence of the literary practice of self-representation in Alfonso X's circles. The background to such practices and views on translation and translators is sought in their own cultural community; the Toledan "aljama" in the thirteenth century. Judah ben Solomon's translation work is brought to bear on the case. His Hebrew corpus of translations, "Midrash Ha-Hokhmah," particularly the section concerned with the "Tetrabiblos," is viewed from a literary perspective, as a space for the translator's self representation. In both texts the construction of the translator's persona (through literary genealogies, interpolations, glosses, and other strategies) emphasizes the translator's active role and his self-representation as "entendudo".

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