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Leonardo Sciascia's "Candido" and Voltaire's "Candide"

Ian R. Morrison
The Modern Language Review
Vol. 97, No. 1 (Jan., 2002), pp. 59-71
DOI: 10.2307/3735619
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3735619
Page Count: 13
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Leonardo Sciascia's
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Abstract

Critics disagree about the extent and nature of the relationship between Sciascia's "Candido" and Voltaire's "Candide." Disagreement arises partly from the number of apparent similarities between the works and partly from inadequate examination of "Candide." This article focuses, therefore, on the three most obvious parallels between the texts and also seeks to pay due attention to Voltaire's tale. The conclusions that emerge are that the two works have a stronger affinity than hitherto suspected, and that the parallels with "Candide" significantly affect the import of "Candido" by emphasizing its pessimism.

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