Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Room Temperature Isolations Can Bias against Selection of Low Temperature Microfungi in Temperate Forest Soils

Margaret M. Carreiro and R. E. Koske
Mycologia
Vol. 84, No. 6 (Nov. - Dec., 1992), pp. 886-900
DOI: 10.2307/3760287
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3760287
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Room Temperature Isolations Can Bias against Selection of Low Temperature Microfungi in Temperate Forest Soils
Preview not available

Abstract

Very different microfungal species were obtained from forest soils in Rhode Island when two different isolation temperatures (0 C and 25 C) were used, even though isolates were obtained from the same samples. At 0 C, Zygomycetes, particularly Mucor and Mortierella species in the sections Hygrophila and Stylospora, were favored. Most fungi isolated at 0 C were psychrotrophs capable of growing from 0 C to temperatures greater than 25 C. However, psychrophiles, mostly Mortierella and Mucor spp., were also isolated, and two new Mortierella species were identified. Isolations at 25 C resulted primarily in the recovery of Deuteromycetes and Mortierella species in the section Isabellina. Most of these isolates were mesophiles with growth minima between 5 and 10 C and maxima above 25 C. It is concluded that isolation temperature can seriously bias our perception of fungal species abundance, dominance and distribution in forest soils. Soil temperatures measured at 10 cm depth for 2 years in a Rhode Island forest remained at or below 10 C for 5 months of each year and did not rise above 19 C. Water potentials in the upper 15 cm of soil were greater than -0.4 MPa over the same period and were not limiting for the growth of most fungi. Therefore, low temperature fungi are potentially active throughout the year in soil of this temperate forest, whereas the activity of mesophiles may be restricted to periods when temperatures are above approximately 10 C. Isolations at 0 C should improve identification of fungi involved in decomposition processes at low temperatures.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
886
    886
  • Thumbnail: Page 
887
    887
  • Thumbnail: Page 
888
    888
  • Thumbnail: Page 
889
    889
  • Thumbnail: Page 
890
    890
  • Thumbnail: Page 
891
    891
  • Thumbnail: Page 
892
    892
  • Thumbnail: Page 
893
    893
  • Thumbnail: Page 
894
    894
  • Thumbnail: Page 
895
    895
  • Thumbnail: Page 
896
    896
  • Thumbnail: Page 
897
    897
  • Thumbnail: Page 
898
    898
  • Thumbnail: Page 
899
    899
  • Thumbnail: Page 
900
    900