Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Morphology and Allergenic Properties of Basidiospores from Four Calvatia Species

Estelle Levetin, W. Elliott Horner and Samuel B. Lehrer
Mycologia
Vol. 84, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1992), pp. 759-767
DOI: 10.2307/3760386
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3760386
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Morphology and Allergenic Properties of Basidiospores from Four Calvatia Species
Preview not available

Abstract

Basidiospores of Calvatia cyathiformis have been identified in aerobiological studies, and spore extracts have demonstrated significant skin and radioallergosorbent test reactivity in sensitive patients. Although fruiting bodies of Calvatia craniiformis, C. rubroflava, and C. gigantea are also relatively common, basidiospores of these species cannot be specifically identified from the atmosphere. The present study compared the morphology and antigenic properties of basidiospores from these four Calvatia species. Electron microscopy showed that they all have globose spores 3-5 μm in diameter but each species has unique spore ornamentation. Only C. cyathiformis spores were sufficiently distinctive by light microscopy to be identifiable on air sampler slides. These spores occurred in the Tulsa atmosphere on 68% of the days during September and October. The allergenic properties were compared using radioallergosorbent test and radioallergosorbent test inhibition. Results indicate that C. rubroflava and C. craniiformis are potentially important aeroallergens. Protein patterns in these species differed from one another and from C. cyathiformis; however, common proteins were also present. Spore extracts of C. cyathiformis from two states were similar by isoelectric focusing but differed in allergenic activity. C. gigantea gave indiscernible protein patterns. These studies indicate that although Calvatia species demonstrate a number of similarities, there are distinctive structural and allergenic properties.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
759
    759
  • Thumbnail: Page 
760
    760
  • Thumbnail: Page 
761
    761
  • Thumbnail: Page 
762
    762
  • Thumbnail: Page 
763
    763
  • Thumbnail: Page 
764
    764
  • Thumbnail: Page 
765
    765
  • Thumbnail: Page 
766
    766
  • Thumbnail: Page 
767
    767