Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Mixed Arbuscular Mycorrhizae from the Triassic of Antarctica

Carlie J. Phipps and Thomas N. Taylor
Mycologia
Vol. 88, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1996), pp. 707-714
DOI: 10.2307/3760964
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3760964
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mixed Arbuscular Mycorrhizae from the Triassic of Antarctica
Preview not available

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizae are the most ubiquitous of mycorrhizal fungi, that have formed mutualistic relationships with virtually almost all major groups of vascular plants. Five genera of arbuscular endomycorrhizal fungi are currently delineated, but fossil arbuscular mycorrhizae have been allied with only two, Glomus and Sclerocystis. A Triassic arbuscular mycorrhiza described inhabiting the roots of Antarcticycas was originally allied with Glomus. It is now known to be a mixed colony comprised of fungi attributable to the suborders Glomineae and Gigasporineae of the Glomales, described as two new species. The fossil Gigasporinean mycorrhiza is characterized by irregularly swollen intercellular and intracellular hyphae that are coiled extensively within the cells. Arbuscules have thick trunks and narrow branches. In the Glominean form, hyphal diameter is more uniform,with coiling rarely present. Arbuscules have thin trunks and fine branches. Vesicles may be lateral or terminal. Spores are not present; therefore, the probability of more than one species of each suborder being represented cannot be conclusively demonstrated. This provides the first fossil representative of the Gigasporineae and supports current rDNA estimates of the age of the lineage. Moreover, it is the first reported instance of a mixed colony of arbuscular endomycorrhizae in the fossil record.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
707
    707
  • Thumbnail: Page 
708
    708
  • Thumbnail: Page 
709
    709
  • Thumbnail: Page 
710
    710
  • Thumbnail: Page 
711
    711
  • Thumbnail: Page 
712
    712
  • Thumbnail: Page 
713
    713
  • Thumbnail: Page 
714
    714