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The Interface between the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus intraradices and Root Cells of Panax quinquefolius: A Paris-Type Mycorrhizal Association

Lara Armstrong and R. Larry Peterson
Mycologia
Vol. 94, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 2002), pp. 587-595
DOI: 10.2307/3761710
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3761710
Page Count: 9
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The Interface between the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus intraradices and Root Cells of Panax quinquefolius: A Paris-Type Mycorrhizal Association
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Abstract

Two major types of arbucular mycorrhizal associations, the Arum-type and the Paris-type, have been identified based on morphological features. Although the Paris-type is the most common, it is the Arum-type that has been most intensively studied in terms of structure/function because of its prevalence in agronomically important plant species. In this study, the interface between the host cell cytoplasm and intracellular hyphae (extensive hyphal coils and arbusculate coils), which typify the Paris-type mycorrhiza, was studied. Using immunofluorescence techniques combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy, dramatic changes in the cytoskeleton in colonized cells were observed. Changes in the positioning of both host cell microtubules and actin filaments occurred in colonized plant cells. Both microtubules and actin filaments were associated with the hyphal coils and the arbusculate coils. An interfacial matrix, of host origin, was demonstrated between hyphal coils and arbusculate coils using various affinity techniques. It formed an apoplastic compartment consisting of cellulose and pectins between the fungus and host cell cytoplasm. There was less labelling adjacent to the fine branches of arbusculate coils compared to the hyphal coils. These observations show some similarities to those seen with Arum-type mycorrhizas.

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