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Primordia Initiation of Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains on Axenic Casing Materials

R. Noble, T. R. Fermor, S. Lincoln, A. Dobrovin-Pennington, C. Evered, A. Mead and R. Li
Mycologia
Vol. 95, No. 4 (Jul. - Aug., 2003), pp. 620-629
DOI: 10.2307/3761938
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3761938
Page Count: 10
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Primordia Initiation of Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) Strains on Axenic Casing Materials
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Abstract

The mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) has a requirement for a "casing layer" that has specific physical, chemical and microbiological properties which stimulate and promote the initiation of primordia. Some of these primordia then may develop further into sporophores, involving differentiation of tissue. Wild and commercial strains of A. bisporus were cultured in axenic and nonaxenic microcosms, using a rye grain substrate covered by a range of organic and inorganic casing materials. In axenic culture, A. bisporus (commercial strain A15) was capable of producing primordia and mature sporophores on charcoal (wood and activated), anthracite coal, lignite and zeolite, but not on bark, coir, peat, rockwool, silica or vermiculite. Of six strains tested, only the developmental variant mutant, B430, produced rudimentary primordia on axenic peat-based casing material. However, none of these rudimentary primordia developed differentiated tissues or beyond 4 mm diameter, either on axenic casing material in the microcosms or in larger-scale culture. In larger-scale, nonaxenic culture, strain B430 produced severely malformed but mature sporophores in similar numbers to those of other strains. Typically, 3-6% of primordia developed into mature sporophores, but significant differences in this proportion, as well as in the numbers of primordia produced, were recorded between 12 A. bisporus strains.

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