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Optical Phase Conjugation Via Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing in Copper Chloride

M. L. Claude, L. L. Chase, D. Hulin and A. Mysyrowicz
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences
Vol. 313, No. 1525, Optical Bistability, Dynamical Nonlinearity and Photonic Logic (Dec. 18, 1984), pp. 385-387
Published by: Royal Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/37646
Page Count: 3
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Optical Phase Conjugation Via Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing in Copper Chloride
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Abstract

We present a study of optical phase conjugation through degenerate four-wave mixing in CuCl, as a function of light frequency, intensity, polarization and sample temperature. The phase-conjugate signal exhibits two maxima at the frequencies of the Γ 5 exciton (one-photon resonance) and of the biexciton (two-photon resonance). By appropriate combinations of the input beam polarizations, it is possible to single out the various terms contributing to the signal (small-spaced, large-spaced population grating and two-photon coherent excitation). The absolute value of χ (3) responsible for the two-photon resonance has been determined (χ (3)(-ω,ω,ω,-ω) = 3.10-7 e.s.u.). It leads to `mirror' efficiencies of the order of 10% for input pump intensities I0≈ 105 W cm-2 and sample thickness d ≈ 10-4 cm. At higher I0, a saturation of the reflection takes place. The variation of the conjugate beam with temperature has been studied in the range 15 K < T < 70 K. Finally, the phase-conjugate nature of the signal has been verified by inserting an aberrator in the path of the input probe beam, and by checking the reconstruction of the reflected beam.

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