Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Rand Health Insurance Experiment and HMOs

Edward H. Wagner and Turner Bledsoe
Medical Care
Vol. 28, No. 3 (Mar., 1990), pp. 191-200
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3765469
Page Count: 10
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
The Rand Health Insurance Experiment and HMOs
Preview not available

Abstract

The Rand Health Insurance Experiment (HIE) provides the most persuasive evidence to date on the relative effects of health maintenance organization (HMO) and fee-for-service care on utilization, costs, client satisfaction, and health care outcomes. Publications from the HIE have suggested that HMO care was associated with lower costs because of reduced hospitalizations, lower client satisfaction, and poorer health status among the subgroup with limited incomes and initial health status. In our view, the evidence justifies the conclusions related to utilization, costs, and satisfaction, but not the suggestion that HMO care had adverse health effects on low-income, sick individuals.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200