Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Health Care CBA/CEA: An Update on the Growth and Composition of the Literature

Anne Elixhauser, Bryan R. Luce, William R. Taylor and Joseph Reblando
Medical Care
Vol. 31, No. 7, Supplement: Health Care Cost-Benefit and Cost Effectiveness Analysis (CBA/CEA): From 1979 to 1990: A Bibliography (Jul., 1993), pp. JS1-JS11
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3766064
Page Count: 11
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Health Care CBA/CEA: An Update on the Growth and Composition of the Literature
Preview not available

Abstract

Cost-benefit (CBA) and cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA) are methods that enumerate the costs and consequences associated with health-related technologies, services, and programs. This article examines the trends in published CBA and CEA of personal health services from 1979 through 1990. It is based on a bibliography that was compiled to help address the immense need for information on the variation and effectiveness of medical practices, particularly as researchers expand their analysis to a study of the cost effectiveness of medical and surgical interventions, health care technologies, preventive practices, and other health programs. A systematic search was conducted for all articles under the heading "cost-benefit analysis" (which includes cost-effectiveness analysis) and "costs and cost analysis." Data sources included the MEDLARS (National Library of Medicine) database, other bibliographies in specialized areas, reference lists in key articles, and contacts with researchers in the field. All titles and abstracts were scanned to determine if the articles pertained to personal health services and if both costs and consequences were assessed. If both criteria were met, the article was included in the bibliography. This search resulted in 3,206 eligible CBA/CEA publications from 1979 through 1990. The publications were subdivided into two major categories: reports of studies and "other" publications, including reviews, descriptions of methodology, letters, and editorials. Reports of studies and "other" publications were classified into approximately 250 different topic areas. The studies were further classified by parameters, such as study type, publication vehicle, and medical function. This article describes the results of this classification and describes trends during 1979 to 1990 compared with 1966 to 1978. The classification of study reports and "other" publications into 250 topic areas is presented in Appendix A. The entire bibliography is reproduced in Appendix B. Detailed tables of findings are presented in Appendix C, and the results are illustrated graphically in Appendix D. Appendix E provides the coding scheme used in the bibliography's data base.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS1
    JS1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS2
    JS2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS3
    JS3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS4
    JS4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS5
    JS5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS6
    JS6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS7
    JS7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS8
    JS8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS9
    JS9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS10
    JS10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
JS11
    JS11