Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Comparison of Services among Different Types of Home Health Agencies

Brent Williams
Medical Care
Vol. 32, No. 11 (Nov., 1994), pp. 1134-1152
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3766322
Page Count: 19
  • More info
  • Cite this Item
Comparison of Services among Different Types of Home Health Agencies
Preview not available

Abstract

Past and proposed public policy reforms in home care have presumed that similar services are provided by different types (e.g., public, proprietary) of home health agencies under a uniform benefit. To examine this presumption, the author used Medicare billing data and interview information for a nationally representative sample of 921 home health patients from the 1984 National Long Term Care Survey, supplemented with data on agency type from the Health Care Financing Administration. In multivariate linear regression models that included patient demographics, marital status, insurance status, living arrangement, urban/rural location, informal support, and functional status, patients of public home health agencies and Visiting Nurse Associations (VNAs) had lower total charges and fewer visits per episode of enrollment than patients of hospital-based, private nonprofit, or proprietary agencies. Public home health agency patients had the lowest and proprietary agency patients the highest number of visits per week of enrollment. Model R2 ranged from 0.13 to 0.22. These results indicate that, for example, similar patients could be expected to incur nearly four times the total charges, and receive three times the total visits and twice the number of visits per week at proprietary as compared with public home health agencies. Patients enrolled in home health agencies with greater incentives to generate revenue incurred more charges, and received more total and more frequent visits than patients enrolled in agencies that can cross-subsidize services. The amount of services and total cost of current proposals to expand the provision of supportive home care services may be strongly influenced by the implicit mix of provider types.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1134
    1134
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1135
    1135
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1136
    1136
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1137
    1137
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1138
    1138
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1139
    1139
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1140
    1140
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1141
    1141
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1142
    1142
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1143
    1143
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1144
    1144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1145
    1145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1146
    1146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1147
    1147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1148
    1148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1149
    1149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1150
    1150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1151
    1151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1152
    1152