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A, B and C in Uganda: The Roles of Abstinence, Monogamy and Condom Use in HIV Decline

Susheela Singh, Jacqueline E. Darroch and Akinrinola Bankole
Reproductive Health Matters
Vol. 12, No. 23, Sexuality, Rights and Social Justice (May, 2004), pp. 129-131
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3775981
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A, B and C in Uganda: The Roles of Abstinence, Monogamy and Condom Use in HIV Decline
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Abstract

Uganda is often cited as a role model in the fight against HIV/AIDS because of its success in reducing both prevalence and incidence of HIV infection since the late 1980s. Although an increase in sexual abstinence has been highlighted as a primary cause of the declines, large increases have also been recorded in monogamy and condom use. The extent to which each of these factors actually influenced the overall decline in Uganda's HIV rates has become a highly charged political issue in the United States, leading to restrictions on how US development funding for combatting HIV is allocated. The Alan Guttmacher Institute investigated changes that occurred in abstinence, monogamy and condom use in Uganda in the 1990s, using nationally representative data from Uganda's Demographic and Health Surveys of 1988 (women only), 1995 and 2000 (women and men), and national-level findings from two surveys by the Global Programme on AIDS in 1989 and 1995 (women and men). Reduction of infection risk by lowering numbers or types of partners among people with more than one relationship was not covered. Here we reprint the chapter on "Implications" from the AGI report, a commentary on the lessons that can and cannot be taken from the data, published in a 2003 Guttmacher Report on Public Policy.

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