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A Survey of Hunting Opponents

William W. Shaw
Wildlife Society Bulletin (1973-2006)
Vol. 5, No. 1 (Spring, 1977), pp. 19-24
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3781278
Page Count: 6
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A Survey of Hunting Opponents
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Abstract

Two hundred Michigan members of a nationally prominent anti-hunting organization were surveyed in 1974. The survey instrument dealt with socio-demographic characteristics and attitudes toward hunting, wildlife, and related issues. As a group, respondents were middle-aged, well educated, mostly women, and from predominately urban backgrounds. Most of the respondents had always objected to hunting and their opposition was supported by a broad range of beliefs and attitudes. This group rated the ecological, aesthetic, and existence values as the most important values of wildlife and habitat destruction was considered wildlife's greatest threat. Implications of these findings for wildlife managers are discussed.

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