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Effects of Selected Observer-Related Factors on Fates of Duck Nests

Bradley C. Livezey
Wildlife Society Bulletin (1973-2006)
Vol. 8, No. 2 (Summer, 1980), pp. 123-128
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3781644
Page Count: 6
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Effects of Selected Observer-Related Factors on Fates of Duck Nests
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Abstract

Data from 667 duck nests found during 1976-78 at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, Wisconsin, were used to test the effects that investigators had on the outcome of nesting. Nests of blue-winged teal (Anas discors) comprised 93% of the sample. Some nest abandonment probably resulted from investigator disturbance and was most frequent during early egg-laying and when more than 1 person approached the nest. Nest predation was not related to the presence of feces at nests, distance from nests to vehicle tracks, time spent at nests by observers, or number of persons that approached nests. Time of discovery and search method were associated with nest success, but comparisons were confounded by differences in stages of nests at discovery.

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