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Preliminary Evaluation of New Cable Restraints to Capture Coyotes

John A. Shivik, Kenneth S. Gruver and Thomas J. DeLiberto
Wildlife Society Bulletin (1973-2006)
Vol. 28, No. 3 (Autumn, 2000), pp. 606-613
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3783610
Page Count: 8
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Preliminary Evaluation of New Cable Restraints to Capture Coyotes
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Abstract

The need for alternative predator capture techniques is increasing, but currently available and tested animal capture technology is limited. To evaluate recently developed devices, we conducted a field study of 4 new types of coyote (Canis latrans) capture and restraint systems. We tested the Belisle®, Panda®, and the Wildlife Service systems to capture coyotes in south Texas during February 1998 and February 1999. We designed field work to determine capture efficiency and selectivity and performed whole-body necropsies to identify trap-related injuries. Results showed a final capture rate (coyote capture per capture opportunity) of 78% for the Belisle, 8.3% for the Panda, 41% for the Collarum, and 66% for the Wildlife Services system. Some of these prototype systems may cause fewer injuries than traditional capture methods but may not be as efficient as jawed traps. To meet or exceed guidelines of recently established international standards for humane trapping, 80% of captured animals cannot show injury indicators of poor welfare, but the Belisle, Wildlife Services, and Collarum devices did not cross this threshold (31%, 40%, 70%, respectively, did not show any indicators). We were not able to capture enough animals with the Panda to thoroughly evaluate the device for selectivity and injury. However, simple modifications and improvements are ongoing and are likely to result in versions of these devices with improved efficiency and fewer indicators of injury.

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