Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

A Hairsnare for Forest Carnivores

Jerrold L. Belant
Wildlife Society Bulletin (1973-2006)
Vol. 31, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 482-485
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3784328
Page Count: 4
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
A Hairsnare for Forest Carnivores
Preview not available

Abstract

I evaluated the efficacy of currycombs attached to cage-trap doors for snaring hair from forest carnivores as a non-invasive technique for detecting and monitoring wildlife populations. Raccoons (Procyon lotor), fishers (Martes pennanti), and American martens (M. americana) were the most common species sampled. In 13 of 16 initial trials, I obtained adequate hair samples using 2 currycombs. Species identification from hair collected during a field trial was 100%. Dorsal guard hairs collected facilitated identification. One nontarget mortality occurred because the individual could not raise the trap door to escape. This technique provides an additional tool for detecting presence and distribution of forest carnivores and ensures that single samples can be obtained for individual identification. With recent advances in DNA analyses, cost-effective population estimates for forest carnivores using hair samples are possible.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
482
    482
  • Thumbnail: Page 
483
    483
  • Thumbnail: Page 
484
    484
  • Thumbnail: Page 
485
    485