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Context, Emergence, and Research Design

Daniel M. Keppie
Wildlife Society Bulletin (1973-2006)
Vol. 34, No. 1 (2006), pp. 242-246
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3784964
Page Count: 5
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Context, Emergence, and Research Design
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Abstract

Context is an important component of research design. But too often there is a noticeable gap between what it is that we actually study and the domain of the original problem or phenomenon that we presumably want to learn about. Herein, I examine the context of research, reductionism, and biological emergence. My goal is to encourage improvement in showing evidence that knowledge gained from research will fit within the context of the issue originally used to rationalize the investigation.

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