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Women and Antivivisection in Late Nineteenth-Century America

Craig Buettinger
Journal of Social History
Vol. 30, No. 4 (Summer, 1997), pp. 857-872
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3789786
Page Count: 16
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Women and Antivivisection in Late Nineteenth-Century America
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Abstract

The antivivisection movement in late nineteenth-century America was a pre-dominantly female crusade, centering on the women of the American Anti-Vivisection Society, founded in Philadelphia in 1883, and growing to a nationwide network of women by the 1890s. The "AVs" were closely connected to the Women's Christian Temperance Union, but little involved in the other great women's cause of the day, suffrage. The AV position was grounded in the Victorian era's strong sense of female responsibility for the advance of Christianity and the molding of the young. Women championed antivivisection because they believed that animal experimentation threatened these sacred trusts.

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