Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Pseudospeciation in the Nuclear Age

Erik H. Erikson
Political Psychology
Vol. 6, No. 2, Special Issue: A Notebook on the Psychology of the U.S.-Soviet Relationship (Jun., 1985), pp. 213-217
DOI: 10.2307/3790901
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3790901
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Pseudospeciation in the Nuclear Age
Preview not available

Abstract

This paper uses the author's concept of pseudospeciation to analyze the potential destructiveness of intergroup/international conflict in the nuclear age. Pseudospeciation, which is fueled by historical and cultural experience, creates a false sense of unique identity in groups and ignores the genetic integrity of the human species. Acceptance of this real integrity combined with the ever-expanding understanding of psychosocial processes provides the means for broadening the concept of identity throughout the human species. Such a wider sense of identity includes not only empathy for others but also willingness to recognize our own otherness.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217