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Attitudes toward a Hypothetical Male or Female Presidential Candidate: A Research Note

Shirley M. Rosenwasser and Jana Seale
Political Psychology
Vol. 9, No. 4 (Dec., 1988), pp. 591-598
DOI: 10.2307/3791529
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3791529
Page Count: 8
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Attitudes toward a Hypothetical Male or Female Presidential Candidate: A Research Note
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Abstract

Effectiveness of male/female candidates for the presidency and the importance of "masculine"/"feminine" presidential duties were investigated. One hundred forty-one college students read a narrative describing a hypothetical presidential candidate. Candidate sex, salience of candidate sex, and the amount of candidate information provided were varied. Participants also rated the candidate's effectiveness on "masculine," "feminine," and "neutral" presidential duties and rated the importance of these duties. Female candidates were rated higher on "feminine" tasks (p < 0.01) while a trend was found (p < 0.10) for male candidates to be rated higher on "masculine" tasks. "Feminine" presidential tasks, though, were rated as less important than "masculine" presidential tasks (p < 0.001) or "neutral" presidential tasks (p < 0.001). Perhaps "masculine" attributes are necessary for a candidate to be considered for the presidency.

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