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Winston Churchill, the Quintessential Sensation Seeker

Jeffery Arnett
Political Psychology
Vol. 12, No. 4 (Dec., 1991), pp. 609-621
DOI: 10.2307/3791549
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3791549
Page Count: 13
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Winston Churchill, the Quintessential Sensation Seeker
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Abstract

Winston Churchill's personality is considered in light of the psychological trait known as sensation seeking. Sensation seeking is a trait conceptualized by Zuckerman (1983) as the degree of an individual's capacity and desire for variety, novelty, and intensity of experience. Examples are provided from each stage of Churchill's life indicating that the pursuit of and pleasure in high sensation was a powerful influence on what he experienced and how he reacted to events. The interaction between Churchill's biologically based propensity for sensation seeking and the quality of his early environment is discussed.

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