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Annual Mortality of Territorial Male Fur Seals and Its Management Significance

Ancel M. Johnson
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 32, No. 1 (Jan., 1968), pp. 94-99
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3798241
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3798241
Page Count: 6
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Annual Mortality of Territorial Male Fur Seals and Its Management Significance
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Abstract

The ages of 249 territorial male fur seals taken on St. Paul Island, Alaska, ranged from 7-17 years; the majority were aged 9-11 years. The ages of 156 males that died from natural causes were similar to the 249 killed. An annual mortality of 0.38 was estimated from the distribution of ages among these 405 adult males. An important cause of death is believed to be fighting. Few males under 10 years of age are successful in holding a breeding territory. Fifty percent of the territories on which males were killed were reoccupied within 24 hours, most replacements probably coming from the water rather than the land. Commercial use of young males could probably be increased without adversely affecting the productivity of the herd.

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