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Blue-Winged Teal Nesting Success as Related to Land Use

Harold H. Burgess, Harold H. Prince and David L. Trauger
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 29, No. 1 (Jan., 1965), pp. 89-95
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3798636
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3798636
Page Count: 7
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Blue-Winged Teal Nesting Success as Related to Land Use
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Abstract

Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) nesting success was studied from 1959 to 1961 to determine its relationship to refuge land-use practices at Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa. Blue-winged teals comprised from 41 to 69 percent of the total breeding population, and a total of 111 teal nests were located. Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were the preferred nesting cover types and supported 77 percent of the teal nests. Grazed grasslands had a nesting density of one nest per 10 acres, and nesting success was 47 percent. Ungrazed land had a nesting density of one nest per 17 acres with a nesting success of 14 percent. Refuge hayfields had a nesting density of one nest per 9 acres and a nesting success of 46 percent. Haying operations were permitted only between July 1 and August 20 to reduce nest losses. Grasslands moderately grazed between June 15 and October 1 provided better nesting habitat for blue-winged teals than did ungrazed areas. Grazed grasslands and hayfields were equally productive nesting habitats for blue-wings.

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