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Some Effects of Heptachlor and DDT on New Brunswick Woodcocks

Bruce S. Wright
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 29, No. 1 (Jan., 1965), pp. 172-185
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3798646
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3798646
Page Count: 14
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Some Effects of Heptachlor and DDT on New Brunswick Woodcocks
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Abstract

New Brunswick woodcocks (Philohela minor) are subjected to pesticides at both ends of their migration. Heptachlor is applied on the winter and breeding range and 2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (DDT) on the breeding range. Sample birds were analyzed for residues of these chemicals at seven points in the breeding cycle. The adults arrive on the breeding grounds carrying both pesticides, and the young are already contaminated when hatched. They may acquire more of both during their first summer, and levels of 4.3 ppm HE (heptachlor epoxide, the metabolic product of heptachlor) and 7.0 ppm DDT are reached by fall. Eighty-six percent of the birds examined in fall migration were carrying HE, DDT, or both. The breeding success in the DDT spray zone has been shown to vary inversely with the amount of DDT used and with the area sprayed. When Nova Scotia is used as a control, it has been shown that the birds in the spray zone have a significantly lower breeding success than those outside it. It is concluded that forest spraying with DDT is an important factor in woodcock breeding success and that heptachlor may become a contributing factor in woodcock management by influencing the utilization of the resource.

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