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Reduction of a Winter Starling Population by Baiting Its Preroosting Areas

Richard R. West
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 32, No. 3 (Jul., 1968), pp. 637-640
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3798951
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3798951
Page Count: 4
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Reduction of a Winter Starling Population by Baiting Its Preroosting Areas
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Abstract

A wintering population of about a quarter million starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) that occupied a single roost and contributed birds to more than 250 cattle feedlots in the South Platte River Valley of Colorado was substantially reduced, probably by more than 60 percent, by baiting two areas, a feedlot and a pasture, where many of the birds gathered each evening before roosting. Poultry pellets, each containing a lethal dose of DRC-1339 (3-chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride) for a starling, were diluted with untreated pellets and cracked corn and exposed at about weekly intervals from November 23, 1964, to March 3, 1965. About 94 percent of the kill was made the first 7 weeks of baiting. The only birds other than starlings known to have been killed were about 10 percent of the more than 500,000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) that shared the roost and feeding areas with the starlings.

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