If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Breeding Season Movements and Habitat Selection of Male Sage Grouse

Richard Wallestad and Philip Schladweiler
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 38, No. 4 (Oct., 1974), pp. 634-637
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3800030
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3800030
Page Count: 4
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Breeding Season Movements and Habitat Selection of Male Sage Grouse
Preview not available

Abstract

Movements and habitat requirements of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) cocks were studied in central Montana during the bvreeding seasons of 1968 and 1972. Fifteen sage grouse cocks were captured and radio-equipped. Movements of up to 0.8 mile (1.3 km) from the strutting grounds were common, with 82 percent of the locations falling beyond 0.2 mile (0.3 km). Sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) with a canopy coverage of 20-50 percent occurred at 80 percent of the 110 locations measured. Average sagebrush canopy coverage at these sites was 32 percent. Strutting grounds are key activity areas within wintering-nesting complexes which can be readily identified and delimited, and should be given complete protection from sagebrush removal projects. Results of this and previous studies in this area indicate that this protection should extend to a radius of no less than 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from strutting grounds.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637