Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Hunting Efficiency and White-Tailed Deer Density

William N. Holsworth
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 37, No. 3 (Jul., 1973), pp. 336-342
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3800124
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3800124
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Hunting Efficiency and White-Tailed Deer Density
Preview not available

Abstract

A herd of 300 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on Griffith Island in Georgian Bay, Ontario, was reduced to 100 deer in a controlled hunt during the winter of 1967-68. Initially, when the density was about 100 deer per square mile, 0.65 deer were shot per hour; at the end of the hunt 0.16 deer were shot per hour. The number of deer killed per hour was equal to the number of deer per square mile times 0.006, the index of hunting efficiency. When hunter effort is measured to the nearest hour, the kill per unit effort can give a reliable index of population density for small areas. Most deer were shot with one shot and were within 100 m of the hunter. Hunters used 1.65 shots per deer killed, and hit each deer 1.3 times. All calibers of rifles used performed equally well. Low hunting efficiency would preclude the commercial harvesting in northern white-tailed deer ranges except in areas with accessible populations exceeding 10-25 deer per square mile.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
336
    336
  • Thumbnail: Page 
337
    337
  • Thumbnail: Page 
338
    338
  • Thumbnail: Page 
339
    339
  • Thumbnail: Page 
340
    340
  • Thumbnail: Page 
341
    341
  • Thumbnail: Page 
342
    342