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Browse and Herbage in Intensively Managed Pine Plantations

Gale L. Wolters and Ronald C. Schmidtling
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 39, No. 3 (Jul., 1975), pp. 557-562
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3800398
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3800398
Page Count: 6
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Browse and Herbage in Intensively Managed Pine Plantations
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Abstract

When 4 cultural treatments--cultivation alone and cultivation with 3 rates of fertilization--were applied to pine (Pinus spp.) plantations on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, pine basal area on the fertilized plots more than doubled that on the untreated control by age 12. All treatments reduced total browse density and crown cover; however, plots fertilized at medium or high rates contained more browse desirable for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) than the control and had as much crown cover from desirable species as the control. On untreated plots the most abundant browse was gallberry (Ilex glabra), an undesirable species; on treated plots it was yaupon (I. vomitoria), a desirable species. Herbage yields on treated plots were less than half that on the control. Broomsedge bluestem (Andropogon virginicus) was the principal forage species on all plots. Only common carpetgrass (Axonopus affinis) increased in yield with intensive culture.

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