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Red Fox Prey Demands and Implications to Prairie Duck Production

Alan B. Sargeant
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Jul., 1978), pp. 520-527
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3800813
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3800813
Page Count: 8
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Red Fox Prey Demands and Implications to Prairie Duck Production
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Abstract

Experiments were conducted during spring and summer with 33 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) to determine prey demands, feeding characteristics, and growth rates using natural foods. Pups began eating prey the 4th week after birth. Then, prey consumption averaged 1.38 and 1.90 kg/pup/week for weeks 5-8 and 9-12 of the denning season respectively, and 2.54 kg/pup/week for the postdenning period. Feeding by adults averaged 2.25 kg/adult/week. Free water was not needed by either pups or adults. About 90 percent of the prey offered to pups on simulated natural diets was consumed; remains varied with prey availability and prey type. Prey biomass required by a typical fox family was estimated at 18.5 kg/km2 for the 12-week denning season and 2.4 kg/km2/week for the postdenning period. Because of the large prey demands, ducks could represent a small part of the foxes' diet and yet be of consequence to the productivity of particular species. An example is provided for the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos).

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