Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Habitat Use by Breeding Virginia Rails and Soras

Rex R. Johnson and James J. Dinsmore
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 50, No. 3 (Jul., 1986), pp. 387-392
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3801092
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3801092
Page Count: 6
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Habitat Use by Breeding Virginia Rails and Soras
Preview not available

Abstract

Habitat use by breeding Virginia rails (Rallus limicola) and soras (Porzana carolina) in northwestern Iowa was correlated highly with the availability of emergent vegetation for both species. Virginia rails preferred fine and moderately robust emergents, and soras were most abundant at diverse shoreward sites. Monotypic stands of glaucous cattail (Typha glauca) received the greatest percentage of use by both species. Structurally, habitat was used as available. No strong niche-segregating mechanism was evident in habitat use. Practices used to encourage waterfowl use are compatible with habitat requirements of breeding Virginia rails and soras. Drawdowns may be used to create attractive emergent diversity and appropriate cover-water interspersion.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
387
    387
  • Thumbnail: Page 
388
    388
  • Thumbnail: Page 
389
    389
  • Thumbnail: Page 
390
    390
  • Thumbnail: Page 
391
    391
  • Thumbnail: Page 
392
    392