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Survival Rates of Bobwhite Quail Based on Band Recovery Analyses

Kenneth H. Pollock, Clinton T. Moore, William R. Davidson, Forest E. Kellogg and Gary L. Doster
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 53, No. 1 (Jan., 1989), pp. 1-6
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3801295
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3801295
Page Count: 6
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Survival Rates of Bobwhite Quail Based on Band Recovery Analyses
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Abstract

We present the results of a long-term (1970-85) band recovery study of northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) at Tall Timbers Research Station, Leon County, Florida. The mean annual survival rate of male quail (18.7 ± 1.2[SE] %) was significantly (P = 0.01) greater than that of females (14.3 ± 1.2%). The difference between survival of young (6-9 months old) and adults (>1 yr old) was 3 ± 2.2% and not significant. Survival rates varied significantly among years. The mean harvest was 23.3 ± 0.53%/year. Young male quail were harvested at a significantly higher rate than adult males (2% difference). There was no significant difference between harvest rates of young and adult females. Juvenile male and female harvest rates were not significantly different. However, adult females were harvested at a significantly higher rate than adult males (5% difference). Harvest varied among years. The mean annual kill (harvest rate + crippling loss) was approximately 30% for both sexes. Male and female natural mortality were approximately 52 and 56%, respectively. There was evidence of additivity of hunting and natural mortality for this population harvested in late winter. Our long-term study provides information on the survival processes for northern bobwhite quail that can be used to enhance management of the species.

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