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Journal Article

Effects of Lead Shot Ingestion on Captive Mourning Dove Survivability and Reproduction

Theodore T. Buerger, Ralph E. Mirarchi and Michael E. Lisano
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 50, No. 1 (Jan., 1986), pp. 1-8
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3801479
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3801479
Page Count: 8

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Topics: Doves, Lead, Eggs, Ingestion, Mortality, Female animals, Toxicity, Liver, Embryos, Kidneys
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Effects of Lead Shot Ingestion on Captive Mourning Dove Survivability and Reproduction
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Abstract

The effects of lead (Pb) shot ingestion on survivability and reproduction of captive mourning doves (Zenaida macroura) were investigated during 1982-83. Survivability was studied in January and February 1983. Doves were randomly assigned treatments (25/treatment) and force fed 0, 1, 2, or 4 No. 8 Pb shot. Mortality among controls and those receiving 1, 2, or 4 pellets was 0, 24, 60, and 52%, respectively. Kidney and liver Pb concentrations in birds that died (TD) were higher (P < 0.05) at all dosages than in control (CS) or treatment (TS) doves that survived (all dosages). Bone Pb concentrations for TS and TD doves dosed with 1 Pb shot were not different (P > 0.05) from CS birds. TS and TD doves dosed with 2 or 4 pellets had higher (P < 0.05) bone Pb concentrations than CS doves, but there were no differences (P > 0.05) among any of the treatments in the TS and TD groups. Another sample of 50 captive doves was tested for effects on reproduction. In January 1982, 25 treatment females were force fed 1 No. 8 Pb shot; another 25 females were untreated. Paired doves were allowed to conduct reproductive activities through September. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in egg measurements (length, width, and weight), productivity, fertility, or squab weight; but a difference (P < 0.05) in hatchability did occur between treatments.

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