Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Rainfall, El Niño, and Dynamics of Mule Deer in the Sonoran Desert, California

Jason P. Marshal, Paul R. Krausman, Vernon C. Bleich, Warren B. Ballard and Jane S. McKeever
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 66, No. 4 (Oct., 2002), pp. 1283-1289
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3802961
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3802961
Page Count: 7
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Rainfall, El Niño, and Dynamics of Mule Deer in the Sonoran Desert, California
Preview not available

Abstract

We used long-term El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO), rainfall, and deer harvest records to investigate effects of ENSO and rainfall on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) population trends in the Sonoran Desert, south-eastern California, USA. We found significant relationships between the southern oscillation index and rainfall (R2 = 0.38, P ≤ 0.001), and between rainfall and annual deer harvest ((R2 = 0.25, P ≤ 0.001). We also found that deer harvest (i.e., an index of deer abundance) in any year was related to accumulations of rainfall >5 years before that hunting season (R2 = 0.34), whereas the change in harvest between years (i.e., an index of rate of population change) was most related to rainfall the year immediately prior to that hunting season (R2 = 0.15). Fluctuations in deer populations in the deserts of California ultimately may be caused by ENSO events.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1283
    1283
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1284
    1284
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1285
    1285
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1286
    1286
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1287
    1287
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1288
    1288
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1289
    1289