Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

Journal Article

Winter Severity and Wolf Predation on a Formerly Wolf-Free Elk Herd

L. David Mech, Douglas W. Smith, Kerry M. Murphy and Daniel R. MacNulty
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 65, No. 4 (Oct., 2001), pp. 998-1003
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3803048
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3803048
Page Count: 6
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Winter Severity and Wolf Predation on a Formerly Wolf-Free Elk Herd
Preview not available

Abstract

We studied wolf (Canis lupus) predation on elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park from 17 March to 15 April 1997 (server winter conditions) and from 2 to 31 March 1998 (mild winter conditions) 2-3 year after wolves were reintroduced to the park. Elk composed 91% of 117 kills. Data comparisons for 1997 versus 1998 were: hunting success rate, 26% versus 15%; kill rate, 17.1 kg/wolf/day versus 6.1; percent of kill consumed in first day, 7 versus 86; percent femur marrow fat of adult kills, 27 versus 70; calf:adult ratios of kills, 2:33 versus 17:23; sex ratio of kills, 14M:19F versus 17M:6F; mean age of elk killed, males 6.1 years, females 15.2 versus males, 4.8, females 13.0. Winter severity influenced the wolf-elk relationship more than the naivete of the elk herd to predation by wolves.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
998
    998
  • Thumbnail: Page 
999
    999
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1000
    1000
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1001
    1001
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1002
    1002
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1003
    1003
Part of Sustainability