Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Molecular Approaches to the Study of Parentage, Relatedness, and Fitness: Practical Applications for Wild Animals

J. Andrew DeWoody
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 69, No. 4 (Oct., 2005), pp. 1400-1418
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3803502
Page Count: 19
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Molecular Approaches to the Study of Parentage, Relatedness, and Fitness: Practical Applications for Wild Animals
Preview not available

Abstract

Historically, novel molecular techniques have been developed by the human genetics community, adapted for nonhuman organisms by evolutionary biologists, and gradually adopted by the wildlife and fisheries communities. Today, evolutionary biologists routinely rely on molecules to assess mate choice, dispersal, parentage, sex ratios, and other population parameters. All in all, the use of molecular genetic markers has revolutionized population biology-human and otherwise. Prescient wildlife and fisheries biologists have recognized the importance of this revolution and are now using molecular genetic tools to evaluate captive or supplemental breeding programs, population dynamics, stocking strategies, and taxonomic issues. Herein, I explore the use of molecular genetic markers to address questions in wildlife biology and management. Specifically, I review how-among other topics-cannibalism, sex-ratios, dispersal, enumeration, genotoxicology, hybridization, and genetically modified organisms can be evaluated in the context of parentage, relatedness, and fitness. As science becomes more integrative and complex, it is easy to envision a future where collaborations between geneticists (who may not have the expertise to obtain the field samples) and wildlife biologists (who may not have the expertise and/or facilities to obtain the genotypes) are common and serve to answer both fundamental and applied questions.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1400
    1400
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1401
    1401
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1402
    1402
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1403
    1403
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1404
    1404
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1405
    1405
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1406
    1406
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1407
    1407
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1408
    1408
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1409
    1409
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1410
    1410
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1411
    1411
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1412
    1412
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1413
    1413
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1414
    1414
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1415
    1415
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1416
    1416
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1417
    1417
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1418
    1418