Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

'Why Are We Cursed?': Writing History and Making Peace in North West Uganda

Mark Leopold
The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Vol. 11, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 211-229
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3804207
Page Count: 19
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($20.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
'Why Are We Cursed?': Writing History and Making Peace in North West Uganda
Preview not available

Abstract

This article examines the nature of peacemaking and social reconstruction in Arua district, a marginalized border area of Uganda, in the late 1990s. After considering other recent accounts of violence and peacemaking, it focuses on the roles of local history writing and other forms of historical narrative in coming to terms with past violence. Local historians had two main aims: to maintain a particular understanding of the past within the local community itself, and to present themselves to others as the victims, rather than the perpetrators, of the violence in their past, as part of a wider process of mending relationships with both neighbouring groups and the Ugandan state. In attempting this, they deployed a variety of media that may be understood as historical narratives, from the performance of ritual healing ceremonies to writing conventional local histories. / L'auteur étudie la nature du processus de paix et de reconstruction sociale à la fin des années 1990 dans le district d'Arua, une région frontalière et marginalisée de l'Uganda. Après avoir examiné d'autres comptes-rendus récents de la violence et des processus de paix, il se concentre sur le rôle de l'historiographie locale et d'autres formes de narration historique dans le traitement des violences passées. Les historiens locaux poursuivaient deux buts : d'une part, entretenir une compréhension particulière du passé au sein même de la communauté locale, et d'autre part se présenter comme les victimes et non les auteurs des violences passées, dans le cadre d'un processus plus large de rétablissement des relations avec les groupes voisins aussi bien qu'avec l'État ougandais. Dans cette tentative, ils ont utilisé différents moyens d'expression que l'on peut considérer comme des narrations historiques, allant de l'exécution de cérémonies rituelles de guérison à l'écriture d'une histoire locale « classique ».

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[211]
    [211]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229