Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Introduction: Making Human Rights Claims Public

Meg McLagan
American Anthropologist
Vol. 108, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 191-195
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3804744
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($15.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Introduction: Making Human Rights Claims Public
Preview not available

Abstract

This introduction explores some of the broader themes in this special section on the technologies of witnessing. In today's globally mediated world, visual images play a central role in determining which violences are redeemed and which get recognized. Northern human rights activists understand this fact and in recent years have built a transnational communications infrastructure through which "local" actors' claims are formatted into human rights "issues." I discuss the axiom that underpins this infrastructure, the notion that "seeing is believing," and then go on to briefly analyze some of the models (mobilization of shame) and forms (testimony) through which activists mediate their claims.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[191]
    [191]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195