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Ergosterol Content of Salt-Marsh Fungi: Effect of Growth Conditions and Mycelial Age

Steven Y. Newell, J. David Miller and Robert D. Fallon
Mycologia
Vol. 79, No. 5 (Sep. - Oct., 1987), pp. 688-695
DOI: 10.2307/3807821
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3807821
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ergosterol Content of Salt-Marsh Fungi: Effect of Growth Conditions and Mycelial Age
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Abstract

Species of the ascomycete genera Phaeosphaeria, Leptosphaeria, and Buergenerula from the Spartina alterniflora decomposition system were analyzed for ergosterol content of their mycelium. Bacterial and algal members of the system were also tested. A standard laboratory liquid medium, a complex, semi-natural liquid medium, and a semi-natural solid medium were used to grow the microorganisms. Ergosterol contents of fungal mycelium ranged from 1.9-2.5 mg g-1 dry organic mass in the standard medium, and were 3.4-16.4 mg g-1 in the semi-natural liquid medium. For any single growth medium, ergosterol content of mycelium was less variable with mycelial age than has been previously found for glucosamine. For Leptosphaeria obiones, ergosterol content in solid medium was estimated to be similar to that in semi-natural liquid, but for Phaeosphaeria typharum, solid medium yielded much higher (× 5) ergosterol estimates, possibly due to underestimated mycelial mass. Partial mycelial autolysis led to low estimates of ergosterol content (1.1 mg g-1 dry organic). Bacteria had negligible ergosterol contents, but there was evidence that green-microalgal ergosterol content might not be negligible in some decomposition systems.

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