Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Snag Characteristics and Dynamics in Douglas-Fir Forests, Western Oregon

Steven P. Cline, Alan B. Berg and Howard M. Wight
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 44, No. 4 (Oct., 1980), pp. 773-786
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3808305
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3808305
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($42.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Snag Characteristics and Dynamics in Douglas-Fir Forests, Western Oregon
Preview not available

Abstract

We studied snags in 30 stands, 5-445 years old, of unmanaged and managed Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) in western Oregon to gain information about snag populations and status after logging. As snag production rates (snags/ha/year) declined from about 100 to 1, mean snag density decreased from 190 to 18/ha in age-classes 35 and 200+, respectively; remnant snags (formed in previous stands) represented 5-14% of current densities. Meanwhile, average snag dbh increased from 13 to 72 cm, and as dbh increased, snags stood longer. Douglas-fir was the dominant species among snags in all forest age-classes. Linear regression analysis showed a correlation (P < 0.001) between snag age and deterioration; populations consisted of fewer young (sound) and old (highly decayed) than middle-aged (partially decayed) snags. Cluster analysis revealed 5 stages of deterioration based upon snag size and decay condition. In unmanaged stands, most (62%) snag populations were distributed randomly, but patches of snags were found in all age-classes. Fewer snags (P < 0.001) remained after thinning and clear-cutting unmanaged forests, and natural snag production was disrupted. Large snags should be retained within forests managed over long (>200-year) rotations; in riparian forests; in extensively managed, slow-growing forests; and within intensively managed forests, safety permitting.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
773
    773
  • Thumbnail: Page 
774
    774
  • Thumbnail: Page 
775
    775
  • Thumbnail: Page 
776
    776
  • Thumbnail: Page 
777
    777
  • Thumbnail: Page 
778
    778
  • Thumbnail: Page 
779
    779
  • Thumbnail: Page 
780
    780
  • Thumbnail: Page 
781
    781
  • Thumbnail: Page 
782
    782
  • Thumbnail: Page 
783
    783
  • Thumbnail: Page 
784
    784
  • Thumbnail: Page 
785
    785
  • Thumbnail: Page 
786
    786