If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Distribution of Mule Deer and Elk in Relation to Roads

Gregory R. Rost and James A. Bailey
The Journal of Wildlife Management
Vol. 43, No. 3 (Jul., 1979), pp. 634-641
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Wildlife Society
DOI: 10.2307/3808741
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3808741
Page Count: 8
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Distribution of Mule Deer and Elk in Relation to Roads
Preview not available

Abstract

Responses of deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus canadensis) to roads were assessed by counting fecal-pellet groups near roads on winter ranges. Data were obtained in Colorado in shrub and pine habitats adjacent to paved, gravel, and dirt roads east of the continental divide; and in shrub and juniper woodland habitats west of the divide. Deer and elk avoid roads, particularly areas within 200 m of a road. Road avoidance was greater (1) east, rather than west, of the continental divide, (2) along more heavily traveled roads, (3) by deer, when compared to elk, and (4) for deer in shrub habitats when compared to pine and juniper habitats. Because of less snow accumulation, winter habitat is more available to cervids east of the continental divide where more pronounced avoidance of roads presumably results from a greater availability of habitat away from roads.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
634
    634
  • Thumbnail: Page 
635
    635
  • Thumbnail: Page 
636
    636
  • Thumbnail: Page 
637
    637
  • Thumbnail: Page 
638
    638
  • Thumbnail: Page 
639
    639
  • Thumbnail: Page 
640
    640
  • Thumbnail: Page 
641
    641